Fancy sleeping in a Castle on your next trip to the UK? Look no further with our list of Castle Stays ….

Ruthin Castle, Denbighshire, North Wales
Originally known as The Red Castle in the Great Marsh, Ruthin was constructed in the late 13th century by Dafydd, the brother of Prince Llywelyn. Located in acres of parkland near the medieval town of Ruthin, the castle has its own dungeon, whipping pit and drowning pool.

Chateau Rhianfa, Anglesey, North Wales
Built in 1849 by the Baronet of Bodelwyddan and his wife, Chateau Rhianfa was inspired by Loire Valley French Chateaus and retains the style today. Now a grade II listed luxury 21-bedroom masterpiece, the chateau has turrets, wine caves and a grand banqueting hall and views over the Menai Strait.

The Fortalice, Blairgowrie, Scotland
Originally built in 1560 as a fortified house to protect the Ogilvys of Airlie from marauders fighting religious battles, today The Fortalice offers luxury rooms complete with four-poster beds, and a ‘Great Hall’, which is dominated by a vast log fire and exquisite hand painted ceiling.

Aldourie Castle, Inverness, Scotland
The historic Aldourie Castle is of Scottish Baronial style and the only habitable castle on the southern shores of the famous Loch Ness. With turrets and towers, hidden doors, old family portraits and vast fireplaces, Aldourie is a medieval castle to the core. Set within a 500 acre private estate, Aldourie is five miles from the city of Inverness and 30 minutes via car from Inverness airport.

Tulloch Castle Hotel, Ross-shire, Scotland
Dating from the 12th century, when only the Laird or Chief of the Clan could enjoy a stay in a Scottish highland castle, Tulloch retains many of its period features, including a 250-year old panelled Great Hall and restored original fireplaces and ceilings.

Crom Castle, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland
Set in rolling parkland where Jacobite battles once raged, the Crom Estate in County Fermanagh is located in Northern Ireland’s Lake District. The historic seat of the Earls of Erne for over 350 years, the castle was designed by the English architect who was responsible for sections of Buckingham Palace. Today, up to 12 guests can stay in the 6-bedroomed West Wing of the castle and dine beneath the spectacular barrel-vaulted ceiling in the former Billiard room.

Dungiven Castle, Londonderry, Northern Ireland
Once the ancestral home of the O’Cahan clan, who ruled the area between the 12th and 17th Century, Dungiven Castle is steeped in history. The song ‘Danny Boy’ is taken from a melody lamenting the passing of the last in the long line of O’Cahan chiefs; Chief Cooey-na-Gall, who is buried in the Old Priory just a few minutes’ walk from the castle. Today it is a family-run 4-star guest house.

Thornbury Castle, Cotswolds, West-Central England
Thornbury Castle offers the chance to spend the night in the Duke’s Bedchamber where King Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn slept 500 years ago. Ornate Tudor architecture, sumptuous bedchambers with hanging tapestries, and historic walled gardens complete Thornbury Castle, which sits at the edge of the Cotswolds in Gloucestershire.

Amberley Castle, West Sussex, Southern England
Hidden away for 900 years in the South Downs, Amberley Castle began life as a hunting lodge for the Bishops of Chichester. Today guests can follow in the footsteps of royalty beneath the original portcullis and 18-meter walls, the same walked by one-time owner Queen Elizabeth I, who held the lease from 1588 to 1603.

Langley Castle Hotel, Northumberland, North East England
Since its construction in 1350, during the reign of Edward III, Langley Castle has been associated with the turbulent history of the Kingdom. During the 17th century the estate became the property of the Earls of Derwentwater, who took part in the Jacobite risings of 1715 and were executed at the Tower of London. Now a luxurious hotel in its own ten acre woodland estate, the castle has retained its architectural integrity while allowing guests to enjoy four-poster beds and window seats set in the 7ft thick castle walls.

More info: www.visitbritain.com